Nationalism in the Dutch East Indies

 

 

The latest podcast episode continues our narrative on Southeast Asia in the early twentieth century, by looking at Indonesia, then called the Dutch East Indies, from 1901 to 1941 (A.D.).  First we will learn how oil was discovered in the islands, and how it replaced spices as Indonesia’s most important product.  Then we will see how the Dutch administered the islands during that time.  Finally we will follow the development of Indonesian nationalism, and meet Sukarno, the first leader of modern Indonesia.

https://www.blubrry.com/hoseasia/28992958/episode-33-nationalism-in-the-dutch-east-indies/

Nationalism in British Burma

 

 

For the podcast’s 32nd episode (33rd if you count the introduction), we will return to the Southeast Asian mainland, and cover the history of Burma, modern-day Myanmar, in the early twentieth century.  In particular we will concentrate our attention on the nationalist movements that sprang up, to oppose British rule.  Three of the nationalists we will meet here, Aung San, U Nu and Ne Win, will become important in future episodes, so remember their names!

https://www.blubrry.com/hoseasia/28583933/episode-32-nationalism-in-british-burma/

The Philippines, the Hollywood Years

 

 

I posted Episode 31 late on Monday; sorry I didn’t announce it here sooner.  With this podcast episode, we begin a narrative completely in the twentieth century, so welcome to recent history!  Here we also conclude the four-part miniseries about the Philippines.  This time we cover the years from 1902 to 1941, looking at the minor wars that came after the Philippine Insurrection (or Philippine-American War, if you’re politically correct), and seeing how Americans and Filipinos learned to work together, so that the Philippines can become independent someday.

https://www.blubrry.com/hoseasia/28123464/episode-31-the-philippines-the-hollywood-years/

The American War in the Philippines

 

 

This is the third episode in the mini-series that the podcast is currently doing about the Philippines.  Here we cover the three-year war the Americans fought to keep the islands after they arrived in 1898.  This also completes our narrative on Southeast Asia in the nineteenth century.

https://www.blubrry.com/hoseasia/27686153/episode-30-the-american-war-in-the-philippines/

America Comes to the Philippines

 

 

Here is Episode 29 for your listening pleasure!  This episode covers the part of the Spanish-American War that was fought in the Philippines.  In doing so we will say goodbye to Spain, and meet the last colonial power to come to Southeast Asia, the United States.  In the past the narrative could cover centuries of events with one episode, but this time almost everything happened in one year, 1898.

https://www.blubrry.com/hoseasia/26996769/episode-29-america-comes-to-the-philippines/

Philippine Nationalism

 

 

The latest episode went up two days ago, and because I was busy in the real world, I didn’t get around to announcing it here until now.  I also took an extra day to get the recording and editing finished.  The end result is the longest episode this podcast has produced so far, So I think you will find it was worth the wait.  For the first time in seven months, we will look at the Philippines.  Here you will hear how Spain lost its tight grip on the islands, and the development of Southeast Asia’s first modern nationalist movement.  The narrative will cover events in the 1700s and most of the 1800s, and end right before the United States got involved in the Philippines, the topic of the next episode.  And for the first time, you will hear my wife make a contribution!

https://www.blubrry.com/hoseasia/26658584/episode-28-philippine-nationalism/

A New Siam

 

I’m afraid I broke a promise.  A month ago, I predicted that future episodes would cover shorter time periods, but today, to get Siam done in one episode, I covered a 157-year time span, from 1782 to 1939.  That means this episode will be the longest so far in the podcast series, but fortunately it is still less than an hour; you won’t have to set aside a day to listen, like you would for Dan Carlin’s history podcast.  Here you will learn how Siam modernized, why it was the only Southeast Asian country that did not become a European colony, and why it changed its name to Thailand at the end of the period.

https://www.blubrry.com/hoseasia/26012651/episode-27-a-new-siam/

1809siam

Here is a map of Siam in the early 1800s, when the kingdom was at its greatest size.  These borders lasted until 1863, when Britain and France started taking parts of the kingdom for themselves.  The core territory they left behind became present-day Thailand in 1939.