Two Hundred Years Since the River Raisin Battle

Neither one of us went out today.  Not only was their snow on the ground (it snowed this morning), but both Leive and I are ill with a minor cold or flu.  I came down with it yesterday, and Leive got it first, so both of us are recuperating at home.  That’s why I didn’t post a message yesterday; I went to bed early instead.

Earlier this week was the bicentennial of one of the battles in the War of 1812, the River Raisin battle & massacre, also called the battle of Frenchtown.  Fought in southeast Michigan in January 1813, this was an unsuccessful attempt by the Americans to take back Detroit, which had surrendered to the British in the previous summer.  I’m mentioning it here because a lot of the casualties suffered came from the Kentucky Militia, and nine of Kentucky’s 120 counties are named after officers who fought in the battle, so the battle played an important part in the state’s history.  You can read the details here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Frenchtown

Click here for more on Kentucky’s role in the war:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kentucky_in_the_War_of_1812

And here is the battlefield’s website:

http://www.riverraisinbattlefield.org/

Published in: on January 25, 2013 at 9:30 pm  Leave a Comment  

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